Environmental

Balancing airport development needs with protection of environmental resources is not only required by national environmental policy law (NEPA), but is also a sound ethical practice. Armstrong provides comprehensive environmental services to identify potential environmental impacts associated with proposed airport development projects. In turn, we provide methods to avoid or minimize impacts where possible and to mitigate unavoidable impacts.

We offer extensive experience in preparing documented Categorical Exclusions (CATEXs) and Environmental Assessments (EAs) for all types of airport development projects, including new airports, major airfield expansions, runway extensions, and landside development. Our certification for wetland delineation and in-depth knowledge of noise analysis, compatible land use planning, and FAA Order 5050.4B, Airport Environmental Handbook, provide the foundation for efficient and timely processing of requisite environmental approvals for your development projects.

The combined experience and capabilities of our planning, environmental, and engineering staff offers a project team that can develop alternative solutions for avoiding or minimizing impacts so that projects can proceed unimpeded. Beyond NEPA documentation, Armstrong has assisted numerous clients in achieving and maintaining environmental compliance on their airport by providing fuel farm siting, storm water permitting, spill prevention and control plans, compatible land use plans, and voluntary noise abatement programs. Our airport environmental services include:

  • Categorical Exclusion Documentation
  • Environmental Assessments (NEPA)
  • Wetland Delineations and Section 404 Permitting
  • SPCC & SWPP Plans
  • Noise Analysis and FAR Part 150 Studies

  • Compatible Land Use Planning and Zoning
  • Air Quality Determinations and Emissions Inventories
  • Voluntary Noise Abatement/Fly Friendly Programs
  • Sustainability Analysis
  • Public Outreach Programs

Please scroll down for project examples.

Environmental Projects
  • Spanish Fork - Springville Airport

    Environmental Assessment

    Spanish Fork, Utah

    Following the completion of the Airport Layout Plan Update, an Environmental Assessment was completed for the proposed extension and shifting of Runway 12/30 at the Spanish Fork-Springville Airport. The shift and extension is needed in order to obtain ownership control of the Runway Protection Zone to correct existing non-standard conditions associated with Runway 12/30, and to accommodate existing and future airport demand. The project also includes wetland mitigation, a road closure and land acquisition. Armstrong has worked closely with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to wetlands, including the development of replacement wetlands outside of the airport influence area. The EA included a high level of public involvement and coordination as well as agreement on the proposed project between two separate municipalities. This complex and potentially controversial EA project was completed in an efficient and quality manner resulting in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) from the FAA. The construction of the runway shift and extension are currently underway at the airport.
    Spanish Fork - Springville Airport | Environmental Assessment | Spanish Fork, Utah
  • Steamboat Springs Airport

    Partial Parallel Taxiway, Hangar Development & Environmental Assessment

    Steamboat Springs, Colorado

    The Steamboat Springs Airport/Bob Adams Field is located in northwestern Colorado, approximately three miles west of downtown Steamboat Springs and is home to skiing and other outdoor activities, including, hiking mountain biking, and camping. The airport provides access to air Medivac services, personal transportation, business transportation, government transportation, flight training activity, and recreational flights. The purpose and need of the proposed action was to provide additional land for future hangar/landside development and the development of a partial parallel taxiway to Runway 32.

    The construction of a full parallel taxiway system is considered essential at airports having at least 20,000 annual operations or those served by commercial service. Although justified, based on the airport’s topography, it is not realistic. Therefore, Armstrong recommended a partial parallel taxiway to Runway 32, which is the predominant departure runway, to eliminate back taxiing of all departures and arrivals and enhance the safety and efficiency of the airport.

    The airport currently has a long hangar waiting list and there are no other locations on the airport suitable or available for hangar development. The planned development provides an ideal location for executive style box hangars along the partial parallel taxiway to Runway 32. This Environmental Assessment evaluated the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action that included the acquisition of 1) approximately 6.9 acres of land for future hangar/landside development, including vehicle access and parking, utilities, and aircraft apron and 2) the development of a partial parallel taxiway to Runway 32 meeting ARC B-II airport design standards, a bypass taxiway at the end of Runway 32, and medium intensity taxiway edge lights and lighted signs.
    Steamboat Springs Airport | Partial Parallel Taxiway, Hangar Development & Environmental Assessment | Steamboat Springs, Colorado
  • Lincoln County Airport

    Fuel Facility & Environmental Assessment

    Panaca, Nevada

    The Lincoln County Airport, located in a rural part of southeastern Nevada, is approximately two miles west of the Town of Panaca. With no fuel facilities on the airport and the nearest airport fuel located 60 nautical miles to the southeast at Mesquite Airport, transient and based aircraft operators are required to operate with a reserve fuel load or make arrangements to provide their own fuel. The airport is utilized by air ambulance, business, personal, fire management, recreational, flight training, search and rescue, and wildlife management. It is the desire of airport management to install a self-service fuel system to provide 24-hour fuel service to transient and based aircraft operators. All airport users will benefit from the availability of fuel facilities and the revenue generated from the fuel sales will help the airport become more financially self-sustaining.

    This project also consists of the construction of a concrete pad on which the fuel tanks and associated piping and fuel dispensers will be placed. Bollards will be installed directly around the tanks to minimize the potential for impact from aircraft or vehicles. Area lighting will be installed to aid in night fueling operations and for added security. One tie-down will be removed to maintain a safe distance between parked aircraft and fueling operations. This Environmental Assessment evaluated the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action, which included the installation of two 12,000 gallon double-walled above ground fuel tanks (ASTs) (one AvGas and one Jet-A) with a credit card reader on the east side of the existing aircraft parking apron.
    Lincoln County Airport | Fuel Facility & Environmental Assessment | Panaca, Nevada